Must have urban survival gear for city dwellers

Must have urban survival gear for city dwellers

urban survival gear
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Survival is commonly associated with the wilderness and most TV shows and sites focus on skills and items you need outdoors. That’s probably why most people tend to ignore the importance of being prepared in a city. Instead of worrying about surviving in the wild, we should focus more on learning survival skills and being prepared for emergencies in our own cities. Urban environments pose different threats than what we might experience out in the wild. This means we also have to prepare accordingly while considering the modern-day threats city dwellers now face.

This video aims to make things easier for them and discusses urban survival items every city dweller and prepper should have. It’s practically not possible to cover every item here, but you should be able to get a fair idea of the kind of stuff you need to survive. Here are some of the most important items you should stock up (and pray you never have to use them).

Bug Out Bag.
A medium-sized transport pack or box is ideal that provides ample space for packing all the necessary items while still being fairly portable. You will hear this also commonly called a “bug out bag” in the prepping community. Important features to consider include heavy-duty zippers, additional storage compartments, water resistance, and padded/adjustable shoulder straps. You don’t have to spend a ton of money to get a decent transport pack as it’s more about finding the right balance between storage capacity, comfort, and price.

First Aid Kit.
First aid kits are available in different sizes (based on the number of items), but a kit should be fairly portable and include everything needed to treat minor pains and aches, including plastic bandages, trauma pad, burn relief pack emergency blanket, sterile eye pad, thermometer, cream pack, aspirin and ibuprofen tablets, cleansing pads and adhesive plastic bandages. Thyrosafe Potassium Iodide Tablets are also recommended, especially for those who live within a 200 KM radius of a nuclear reactor.

Flashlight.
Chances are good that you already have a flashlight, but you might want something more ‘tactical’ for surviving a long-term emergency. Tactical flashlights offer brighter light, more battery capacity, can survive a dip in water and support SOS/emergency signals.

Food, Water, and Fire.
A quick boost of nutrients greatly improves the chances of survival and there are plenty of options to choose from. Such food rations have high energy value and come with around 5-year shelf life for long-term storage. A stainless steel water bottle allows storing around a liter of water, while you’d also want to stock up water purification tablets. Disposable lighters are the most economical and easiest way to light up something, but you can also consider magnesium fire starters and stormproof matches.

Self Defense.
While you might be able to get away with a knife in most situations, you need something better to deal with long-term emergencies. You can find a variety of multi-purpose knives that can also be used as a pickaxe and hatchet. Made of 1095 carbon steel, SP16 SPAX is one such product that is specially designed for rescue, military, and sporting use.

Environmental Protection.
Essential items that can greatly help protect from environmental hazards include safety goggles, specialized gloves, masks, and earplugs.

Shelter.
Shelter equipment includes tear-resistant, water proof emergency blankets (able to reflect most of the body heat), a tube tent, roll duct tape, cord such as paracord and zip ties.

Communications.
Your mobile phone won’t be of much use when there is no power and people are running for their lives. You’d need gear like a multi-purpose AM/FM radio with crank charging and built-in flashlight and an emergency whistle.

Other tools.
Some other tools and items that can be helpful in an emergency include multi-tools, eating utensils, batteries (such as AA and AAA) and a small pry bar. Keeping some cash hidden at home might also be a good idea as you cannot count on plastic money when there is no power. Cash can give you an upper hand when you have to negotiate for buying food and other basic necessities.

That the end of this video. don’t forget to like, comment and subscribe and I’ll see you in the next video.

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